The utility of the Developmental Propensity Model to differentiate among diverse forms of disruptive behaviors

The utility of the Developmental Propensity Model to differentiate among diverse forms of disruptive behaviors

The utility of the Developmental Propensity Model to differentiate among diverse forms of disruptive behaviors

Poster presentation119Lorena Maneiro, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Room P4Fri 14:30 - 15:15

Early-onset disruptive behavior can negatively impact children’s development by becoming, in some cases, the precursor of later developmental trajectories characterized, long-term, by more severe and harmful forms of antisocial behavior. Advancing towards sound etiological models that could inform early preventive interventions is, therefore, of paramount importance. Lahey & Waldman (2003) have proposed that high Negative Emotionality (NE), high Daring (DAR) and low Prosociality (PROS), are the main components of an “antisocial propensity”, suggesting that these temperament dimensions should be necessarily examined simultaneously when studying the risk for disruptive behavior, because of their additive, and possible interactive, effects. Similarly, the environmental transactions (i.e. family interactions) through which they operate. Our objectives were: 1) to study the separate and combined contribution of the temperamental dimensions (i.e. NE, DAR, PROS) to predict distinct forms of child disruptive behavior (e.g. ADHD, ODD, CU traits), and 2) to analyze the possible interactive effects between these temperament dimensions and different parenting styles. We used parent-reported data on child temperament, disruptive behavior, and parenting practices from the third data wave of ELISA Project, a large-scale ongoing longitudinal study conducted in Galicia (NW Spain). The initial community sample was composed of 2467 preschoolers (48% girls), aged 3-6 (Mean=4.25; SD=0.91). We tested different structural equation (SEM) models in Mplus.7. Our findings support the convenience of considering not only the three temperamental dimensions, but including also parenting practices for their utility to better account for levels of child disruptive behaviors through their interactive specific associations with the dispositional antisocial propensity.
Co-authors: Beatriz Domínguez-Álvarez, Aimé Isdahl-Troye, Patricia Navas, Laura López-Romero, Estrella Romero

Life course perspectives in youth forensic psychiatry
children, disruptive behaviour, parenting, temperament
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