Quality Forensic Care-Youth: a selection of projects to improve the quality of the forensic youth care

Quality Forensic Care-Youth: a selection of projects to improve the quality of the forensic youth care

Quality Forensic Care-Youth: a selection of projects to improve the quality of the forensic youth care

Symposium122Ed Hilterman, Expertise centre of Forensic Psychiatry; Michiel de Vries Robbé, Anneke Kleeven, Amsterdam UMC; Brenda Riegman, Collin Hoogeveen, Jolien van Aar, Isa Eekhout, VanMontfoort; Kees Mos, Forensic Centre Teylingereind/RIJ De Hartelborgt, The Netherlands

Room 1GWed 10:45 - 12:15

"Together we are stronger": The Quality Forensic Care-Youth (KFZ-J) program was launched in 2018 with this idea in mind. Within the program the field of forensic youth care works together to increase the quality and effectiveness of interventions and treatments. The aim is providing better care for at-risk youth, and a safer society for everyone. Through a selection of three different projects that are financed within the program an overview of the available projects is given. The projects that will present itself are: 1) Risk Screener – Youth, a risk screener that was developed from scratch, 2) So-Cool, an intervention that is researched on effectiveness in the increase of social skills, social problem-solving and self-confidence, and the reduction of recidivism) and 3) MDFT, a family-based intervention that was further developed.

Presentation 1: What is Quality Forensic Care-Youth?

Background: The Quality Forensic Care-Youth (KFZ-J) program was launched in 2018 to unite strengths and to coordinate quality improvement in forensic care for juveniles. Within the program the field of forensic youth care works together to increase the quality and effectiveness of interventions and treatments. The aim is providing better care for at-risk youth, and a safer society for everyone.Objective: Present a short explanation of the program Quality Forensic Care-Youth (KFZ-J).Methods: Through directed and open calls KFZ-J invites institutions and professionals to participate in projects and to work on quality improvement of forensic care for juveniles. Results: KFZ-J finances and supervises different types of projects that are all directed towards the improvement of the quality of care in juvenile forensic care. Conclusion: Uniting knowledge and strengths leads to a focus on quality improvement: "Together we are stronger".

Presentation 2: Risk screening for (violent) recidivism by juveniles and young adults: introducing the new Risk Screener - Youth

Background: Juvenile justice seeks better insight into risk and protective factors for treatment planning, allocating interventions, triaging comprehensive assessment, measuring progress and informing release decision-making. However, comprehensive risk assessment is not always feasible, necessary, or desirable. Therefore, simplified risk evaluation was developed that includes risks and strengths regarding concerns about future violence and criminality.Objective: The newly development Risk Screener-Youth (RS-Y) is presented, providing easy-to-use screening as feasible alternative for juveniles and young-adult risk evaluation. The RS-Y contains a staff rated version and a self-assessment version, to help juveniles gain insight. Potential value for assessment and intervention in forensic practice is discussed.Method: The RS-Y was tested retrospectively and evaluated prospectively in clinical practice. For 98 individuals the RS-Y, SAVRY and SAPROF-YV were rated at discharge from Dutch juvenile justice institutions (30 cases double-rated).Results: The RS-Y interrater-reliability was excellent (ICC=.92). Predictive validity was moderate-good for general and violent recidivism within 1yr and long-term follow-up (AUC=.66-.79), comparable to comprehensive risk assessment tools. Prospective evaluation showed positive feedback from treatment providers and juveniles.Conclusion:The RS-Y offers a feasible easy-to-use screening alternative to evaluate risks and strengths to better inform intervention goals and ensure improved decision-making preventing violent and non-violent recidivism.

Presentation 3: So-Cool

Background: So-Cool (Sociaal-Cognitieve Oplossingen Leren; Social-Cognitive Solutions Training) is an individual behavioural intervention based on the social-information processing model, for young people aged from 12 to 23 years with a mild intellectual disability (IQ of 50-85) who commit offences. The main aim is to reduce recidivism among these delinquent youngsters, by increasing social skills, social problem-solving and self-confidence.Objectives: To test whether So-Cool indeed increases social skills, social problem-solving and self-confidence, and reduces recidivism.Methods: We compared pre- and post-measures of 411 youngsters who participated in So-Cool on social skills (TOPS-A), social problem-solving (SIVT) and self-confidence (CBSA). We also have data on the number of offences these youngsters committed three years after participation in So-Cool, which we compared to the number of offences of a matched control group (care as usual).Results: After participation in So-Cool, youngsters show better social skills, response generation and selection, and self-confidence (pre-post measures differ significantly). Recidivism analyses are still running.Conclusion: So-Cool seems effective in improving the social problem solving skills and self-confidence, which -if low- are considered risk-factors for recidivism. Whether So-Cool also reduces recidivism is still to be determined.

Presentation 4: Working from inside to outside: experiences with family therapy for young adults

Background: We will present results of a pilot-study focused on the further development of the family-/system-therapy Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for young adults of 18-23 years (funded by KFZ-J (Quality Forensic Care-Youth)). The project was in two Juvenile Justice Institutions (JJI) in the Netherlands, Teylingereind and Hartelborgt. Starting with family therapy in detention offers opportunities, research showed increased motivation to participate in family-therapy.Objectives: What are the developmental needs of emerging adults and outcomes of the pilot-study?Methods: In JJI’s the number of young adults (18-23yrs) has increased since in 2014 the age was raised at which this group could be treated as juveniles. This permits detention in JJI’s with the possibility of a more pedagogical approach.Results: We examined if MDFT could be implemented as effective treatment for young adults placed in a JJI. We followed a cohort of 20 males, who committed serious violence crimes. The results confirmed that MDFT improves social re-integration of convicted youths. During and after treatment, they hardly committed any offence. Positive changes were noted in substance use, school- and work-orientation and debt repayment.Conclusion: It’s feasible to implement system therapy in a JJI. First outcomes are promising, but more research is needed.

Assessment and treatment of young and/or adolescent offenders
family-based, intervention, risk screening, social skills
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