Personality Functioning in self-report and informant report in a sample of juvenile delinquents

Personality Functioning in self-report and informant report in a sample of juvenile delinquents

Personality Functioning in self-report and informant report in a sample of juvenile delinquents

Individual presentation73Marc Birkhölzer, University Psychiatric Clinic Basel, Switzerland

Room 4FThu 14:00 - 15:30

The diagnostic system to diagnose Personality Disorders (PD) is fundamentally changing with the ICD-11. Almost identical to the Alternative Model of Personality Disorders (AMPD) and herein the Levels of Personality Functioning (LPF) concept, that was first introduced in Section III of the DSM 5 in 2013, PD is characterised by problems in functioning of aspects of the self (e.g., identity, self-worth, accuracy of self-view, self-direction), and/or interpersonal dysfunction (e.g., ability to develop and maintain close and mutually satisfying relationships, ability to understand others’ perspectives and to manage conflict in relationships). Also, there will no longer be any age limit to diagnose PD.

Methods:
Inspired by the DSM 5 LPF concept, our workgroup developed the LoPF-Q 12-18 self-rating questionnaire (published in 2018) and the LoPF-Q 6-18 parent report to capture impairment in personality functioning in children and adolescents. Both inventories were used in a mixed clinical and school sample of more than 400 children and adolescents.

Result:
Scale reliabilities for the parent report total score are α .97 and α .89 (ID), α .91 (SD), α .92 (EMP) and α .91 (INT) for the subdomains. The LoPF-Q 6-18 parent report distinguishes between students (n=172) and PD patients (n=22) with d=2.4 standard deviations (p .000). Concerning conduct disorder (CD) and Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) no differences in LoPF-Q self-rating scores were found compared to students. However, these groups largely differed using the LoPF-Q parent report.

Conclusion: Both, the LoPF-Q 12-18 self-report and the LoPF-Q 6-18 informant report distinguish well between PD patients (except APD) and students. However, patients with externalizing disorders seem far less impaired in self-rating than in informant rating. This generally calls into question the validity of self-rating questionnaires in suspected CD or APD cases and highlights the importance of informant ratings in this group.

Assessment and treatment of young and/or adolescent offenders
assessment, personality disorders, personality functioning
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