Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services: insights after 18 months of service

Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services: insights after 18 months of service

Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services: insights after 18 months of service

Individual presentation62Rebecca Lane, Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, United Kingdom; Sophie D'Souza, Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, United Kingdom

Room 3AThu 10:30 - 12:00

Objectives:
Young people in contact with forensic child and adolescent mental health services present with more complex needs than young people in the general population. Recent policy in child and adolescent mental health has led to the implementation of new workstreams and programmes to improve service provision. This paper examines the characteristics and outcomes of children and young people referred to newly commissioned Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Services (F:CAMHS) and service activity during the first 18 months of service.

Design:
The study is a national cohort study to describe the population and investigate provision and service access across England.

Methods:
Routine activity data from 13 services has been collected for secondary analysis.

Results: Data on 1250 advice cases and 1303 referrals is included in analysis. Findings show that 73.1% of young people had accessed CAMHS before their referral, 13.7% of young people referred presented with a learning disability and 51.88% of young people presented with multiple problems. Mixed ANOVAs found significant reductions in overall clinician-rated HoNOSCA scores after referral to Community F:CAMHS.

Conclusions:
This research is the first study to describe the characteristics of children and young people referred to Community F:CAMHS and provides valuable information on pathways and needs to inform service policy and provision. The data suggests that Community F:CAMHS has a positive impact on mental health and risk outcomes of the children and young people referred to them. Limitations include a small sample at follow-up and using routine data for analysis.

Community based interventions with young offenders
community
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